The Mediterranean diet is good for the elderly too

A study by the Neuromed Institute in Italy reveals that following a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of death by 25% in people over 65 years of age.

It's never too late to change our eating habits. A study by the Neuromed Institute in Italy reveals that following a Mediterranean diet reduces the risk of death by 25% in people over 65 years of age.

A Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, pulses, olive oil and cereals, low in meat and dairy products, and involves a moderate consumption of wine during meals.

25% reduction in mortality

5,000 people over 65 were followed for 8 years. Italian researchers also analyzed other epidemiological studies published in several countries, ultimately based on a cohort of more than 12,000 participants.

"The novelty of our research is to have focused our attention on a population over 65 years," said Marialaura Bonaccio, epidemiologist and director of the study. "We already knew that the Mediterranean diet is able to reduce the risk of mortality in the general population, but we did not know if it would be the same for the elderly".

The new data extracted by his team clearly show that a Mediterranean diet is associated with a 25% reduction in all-cause mortality. The positive effect persists if one specifically considers cardiovascular or cerebrovascular mortality.

Moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages

Licia Iacoviello, head of the Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Laboratory at the Neuromed Institute, says: "Our research looks at nutrition as a whole, but it is interesting to understand which foods contribute most to the effect. engine of the Mediterranean diet. Here it is mainly the moderate consumption of alcoholic beverages. "

People aged 60 and over are currently 15 million in France. They will be 20 million in 2030 and nearly 24 million in 2060. The number of over 85 will increase from 1.4 million today to 5 million in 2060.

Video: How to eat a heart-healthy diet (January 2020).